When to Use Your Copywriting Skills–and When Not to

It’s tempting, when you have acquired some–if not all–of the persuasive skills necessary to writing good, compelling copy, to try and utilize those skills and that ability 24/7 in EVERYTHING you write, no matter to whom and no matter for what, whether it is appropriate or not.

In other words, it’s one thing to know how to be a ‘salesman in print’–that’s something you certainly need if you want to persuade a prospect or client to buy from you instead of from somebody else.  It’s a whole ‘nother thing to know when to turn it off!

One scenario in which you definitely need to know how to “turn it off” is when you are writing a personal e-mail to someone.

There’s a totally different reason why you’re writing that instead of a marketing-driven sales letter or website page.

Nick Usborne talks about this in his article, which you can read here.

Nick makes two points.  First, using copywriting tactics to try to manipulate someone in a personal e-mail is just plain wrong.

Second, when copywriting is done in a natural and ethical–even “masterful”–way, the person reading it does not realize that it is “copywriting” he is reading.

If you read and study the very best copywriters, you’ll find that even when they are selling at their hardest their copywriting craft is all but invisible. You don’t get the feeling you are being “copywritten” at.

This is copywriting at its best.

Nick is one of “the very best copywriters.”  You can read his post here:

http://www.nickusborne.com/when-to-use-your-copywriting-skills/

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About Paul Ramirez

I'm a husband and father and businessman who promotes and practices free-market, Bible-based principles to help others achieve success.
This entry was posted in Copywriting, E-mail, General. Bookmark the permalink.

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